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Ethical Edge Letters on Integrity  

Click here for Russell Williams' bio


Tuesday, May 04, 2010
Is there meaning entering the deal?
Tuesday, May 18, 2010
Walk with, not over others
I stand in the center of influence


 “If I were required to guess off-hand … what is the bottom cause of the amazing material and intellectual advancement of the last 50 years, I should guess that it was the modern-born and previously nonexistent disposition on the part of men to believe that a new idea can have value.” —Mark Twain

The great 19th century American humorist and political-social commentator Mark Twain unearthed the hidden jewel that moves the human spirit – the belief that my new idea has value.

In the early 20th century, Henry Ford believed in a new idea, the division of labor. With it he mobilized a worldwide industrial revolution. Another innovator, Walt Disney, tinkered with a new idea, animation, transforming the film world. These two men unleashed the same energy that drives the movement of all entrepreneurial activity in every professional walk of life: belief in a new idea that propels us to action.

One big, bold, duplicable idea in today’s marketplace is now providing endless opportunity for creative expression, professional fulfillment and bottom-line results for men and women engaged in business startups, as well as Fortune 500 companies. The idea? I stand in the center of influence!

Tom Peters and Bob Waterman capture this big idea in their watershed book, "In Search of Excellence." They write about the eight principles of organizational excellence. The eighth principle, "Simultaneous, Loose-Tight Properties," states that organizations pursuing excellence are defined by rigid control while simultaneously insisting on autonomy, entrepreneurship and innovation from the rank and file.

More recently in their bestseller, "The Starfish and The Spider," Ori Brafman and Rod Beckstrom argue that organizations fall into two categories: traditional "spiders," which have rigid hierarchy and top-down leadership, and revolutionary "starfish," which rely on the power of peer relationships where influence is everywhere present because the organizational mind resides in the actions of personal influence.

Mission Integrity Action

This week gives new focus and renewed energy to the big, bold idea: I stand in the center of influence! I exercise the ethical asset of clarity as I encourage, engage and build relationships that create cooperative, productive results. I recognize and encourage others to pursue the power of their positive influence, appreciating everyone’s talents and abilities at work for good.

Appreciating you on the ethical edge!

Russell Williams,
founder/president
Passkeys Foundation/Ethical Edge
ethicaledge.org