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COVER STORY
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O.C. healthcare, continued ...Published: September 01, 2012

CHOC Children's
CHOC’s Cripe agrees.
   
“As one of the leaders in technology, CHOC has made tremendous investments in technology that transform the delivery of care,” she says. “We were among the earliest group of healthcare providers in the nation to implement computerized physician-order entry, making us a national leader in advanced technology for patient safety and quality.” 
   
Innovative devices produced by forward-thinking companies such as 
Masimo Corp. in Irvine also play a large role. Orange County’s location between San Diego and Los Angeles gives the region a hybrid flavor, says Joe Kiani, CEO and chairman of the board of Masimo, a medical device company and innovator of noninvasive patient-care technologies.
   
“Orange County has some of the high-tech from both [Los Angeles and San Diego],” says Kiani. “It’s progressive and has become a great place for technology to take shape.”
   
One of the most important trends in technology includes connecting all of the data together and making sense of it, says Kiani, who tells of a recent news story about a 12-year-old boy who slipped on a basketball court and developed sepsis. The diagnosis came too late and the child died.
   
“This could have been totally avoided,” says Kiani. “The data was there, but no one put the pieces together.”
   
As an example of the type of high-tech system that may have prevented this tragedy, Kiani refers to Masimo’s Halo Index, an indicator that takes into account a wide range of physiological parameters and provides clinicians with a quick assessment of a patient’s status with a readout ranging from 1 to 10.
   
Kiani credits his company’s success to its ability to address the hard problems, such as noninvasively measuring hemoglobin and reducing the common problem of false alarms produced by pulse oximeters, a device that measures a patient’s hemoglobin saturation.
   
“Masimo is different from other medical device companies in that we were founded by engineers,” says Kiani. “So we think of things as solutions that must be first proved mathematically, and then we look at it empirically to see if it works – not the other way around.”
   
The community expects technological innovations in this county, says Darrin Montalvo, St. Joseph Health’s executive vice president, Southern California Region, and CFO of St. Joseph Health in Orange.


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