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EMPLOYMENT
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Hyundai noted as a 2013 Military Friendly Employer

The Costa Mesa-based automaker is recognized by Victory Media for its veteran-friendly programs

by Jason WheelerPublished: December 19, 2012 10:15 AM

Victory Media, publisher of G.I. Jobs and other periodicals for veterans and military families, has named Hyundai Motor America as a 2013 Military Friendly Employer. Using the same survey and methodology as their Top 100 Military Friendly Employers list, the automobile distributor was scored through programs and policies including percentage of hires with prior military service, company military recruiting efforts and retention programs.

“It is a tremendous honor for us to be named a military friendly employer by Victory Media. Providing opportunities to the men and women that have served this country is an important part of our commitment to diversity and inclusion at Hyundai,” said Paul Koh, acting executive director of human resources for Hyundai Motor America. “We greatly appreciate and value the knowledge and expertise that employees with military experience bring to our company.”

Hyundai Motor America will be honored among other companies designated as Military Friendly Employers in Victory Media’s January edition of G.I. Jobs Magazine.

“Companies earning the prestigious Military Friendly Employers designation are rising stars with strong military recruitment programs and meaningful job opportunities for transitioning service members and spouses seeking civilian employment,” said Sean Collins, vice president for Victory Media and director of G.I. Jobs. “These Military Friendly Employers are on the right trajectory to be a top 100 Employer in years to come.”


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