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EDUCATION INDUSTRY NEWS
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Cal State Fullerton president steps down

Milton Gordon will retire after more than two decades as president of the university.

By Karly BarkerPublished: September 14, 2011 09:35 AM

After 21 years as president of Cal State Fullerton, Milton Gordon announced he is stepping down. President Gordon made the announcement during his convocation speech on Tuesday - saying he will retire as soon as his successor is chosen.

"Being president of this great university has been one of the most exciting and professionally satisfying experiences in my professional career,” Gordon said. “I love this university, take great pride in what we have accomplished together and know a bright future lies ahead for Cal State Fullerton.”

Gordon, who turned 76 in May, helped the university grow from 25,600 students to more than 36,000 enrolled this fall. During his tenure, Gordon celebrated the university’s 40th and 50th anniversaries. The institution says the number of academic degrees during his service has risen from 91 to 104, including the formation of a doctorate in education, which is one of the first in the Cal State System.

"It has been an honor and a privilege to serve as your president, and I wish to thank all of you…for your ongoing support, help and advice, which has helped to build Cal State Fullerton into the extraordinary university that it is today,” Gordon said.

In addition, Gordon has overseen the largest construction period in the university’s history. The college says more than $636 million worth of construction was completed during his tenure.

"I am grateful that I'm able to call higher education my life's work,” Gordon said. “I will hand over the reins with confidence and pride.”

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